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Presidential Fertilizer Initiative Programme has commenced. Eleven blending plants are in now in full operation in different locations across the country. The fertilizer will be sold to farmers at a price of N5,500 per 50KG bag only by State Governments, registered distributors and dealers registered with FEPSAN. Intrested distributors/dealers to participate in the scheme can register with any of the blending plants and at FEPSAN office at No 1. NIDB Building, Muhammadu Buhari way, Kaduna. Whistle blower Nos: 08175777724, 08175077773

“This paper means I get paid on time for my potatoes, even when the weather is bad,” he said.
The precious document is a farming contract Macharia signed in March with the East African Potato Consortium. It says he will sell at least two tonnes of potatoes to food processors each harvesting season for the next two years.
“Thanks to this contract I can earn up to 22,000 Kenyan shillings ($213) per season,” he said.
Recurring drought and sudden cold spells have affected the quality of potatoes and other staples across Kenya.
Peris Mukami, a farmer from Timau village, in Meru County, said her potato yields had declined by over 10 percent in the past two years because “it is either too cold or too hot”.
“The cold damages potato vines with frostbite while heat makes them wilt,” she explained.
To try to fight back, Kenyan potato farmers such as Macharia are increasingly turning to production contracts with food processors – a system known as contract farming – through the East African Potato Consortium.
By working with the consortium, they get access to seeds that better stand up to harsher conditions, as well as better fertilizers.
They also get a guaranteed price for their crop, as long as they produce good-quality potatoes on time, said Wachira Kaguongo, head of the National Potato Council.

FAIR DEALS
The consortium, which was set up in 2016 by the National Potato Council, the Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa and the Grow Africa partnership, aims to increase private investment in agriculture by linking potato farmers with food processors across the country, Kaguongo said.
Each production agreement is reviewed and approved by the National Potato Council, which ensures it is fair to both parties, said Willy Bett, cabinet secretary of the Kenyan Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Fisheries.
“Businessmen will always want to get farmers to sign something that may not be favorable to them,” Bett told the Thomson Reuters Foundation. “We’re trying to prevent that by ensuring that farming activity is done on a contract basis in Kenya.”
Contract farming has allowed farmers to sell produce to food giants such as the fast-food chain KFC, formerly known as Kentucky Fried Chicken.
Macharia’s potatoes now fetch 22 shillings ($0.20) per kilo, more than double what he used to get when selling them at the Kipipiri open air market.
“I am paid in cash at my farm,” he said. “And I do not have to travel to the market when I don’t want to.”
So far 5,000 farmers have signed up to the system, with a total of 23,000 expected to have made the switch by 2020, said Kaguongo.

SUPPLY SHORTAGE?
Felix Matheri, a researcher at the International Center of Insect Physiology and Ecology, said that while contract farming provides farmers with a steady income, it risks depriving poor families of their food supply.
“Contracts bind farmers to supplying an agreed amount of potatoes, meaning that when the harvest is low farmers are forced to sell all their produce to meet their obligations,” he explained.
“But potatoes are rich in starch and a critical source of nutrients – farmers should save some for home consumption,” he said.
Others have concerns about contract farming as well. Louise Wangari, a roadside seller of potatoes in Nyandarua County, said she is worried it might affect the supply she gets from farmers.
“The quantity of potatoes I was getting from farmers was already decreasing due to extreme weather,” she said.
“If they start signing contracts with other buyers, then I may be out of business soon, as I can’t afford to pay them as much as the food processors.”
Reporting by Kagondu Njagi, Editing by Zoe Tabary and Laurie Goering. Please credit the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters that covers humanitarian news, women's rights, trafficking, property rights, climate change and resilience. Visit news.trust.org
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-korea-japan-comfortwomen/japan-rejects-south-korean-call-for-extra-steps-over-comfort-women-idUSKBN1EY0F6

Agriculture

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Fertilizer Brands in Nigeria

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Messages to Farmers

  • Apply fertilizer wisely to avoid wastage
  • Attend trainings on fertilizer use and application
  • Obtain quality fertilizers from reputable suppliers especially FEPSAN distributors
  • Store unused fertilizer away from children, fire, rain and entry of foreign material.
  • Form groups/associations to benefit from group/association dynamics.
  • Allow your crops to fully mature to get quality and values
  • Report fertilizer adulteration to the appropriate authority

Upcoming Events

  • Fertilizer Outlook & Technology Conference, Date: 13 - 15 November, Venue: Jacksonville, Florida, USA Read more
  • Bringing Balanced Fertilizers to Smallholder Farmers Training, Date: November 19 - 23 2018, Venue: Abuja, Nigeria Read more

Some Useful Links

Golden Fertilizer         ||     TAK Agro
Notore
                         ||      Indorama
Chicason Group          ||      Dangote
CountrySTAT              ||     Farm Cafe Nigeria
FAO                            ||      USAID
IFDC                           ||      NABG
World Bank              ||     AFDB
IFAD                           ||     JICA

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Mission

To provide a platform for the stakeholders in the public and private sectors of the fertilizer industry to develop effective public private partnerships in order to ensure timely supply of adequate quantity and quality fertilizers; and to promote professional, moral and ethical practices in the industry.

Vision

Attain improved productivity and environmental sustainability of Nigerian Agriculture through balanced and judicious use of fertilizers....Attain improved productivity and environmental sustainability of Nigerian Agriculture through balanced and judicious use of fertilizer...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

Contact

2nd Floor Bank of Industry Building
18 Muhammad Buhari Way, Kaduna, Nigeria.
Mobile: +234 (803) 3174409
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2nd Floor Bank of Industry Building 
18 Muhammad Buhari Way, Kaduna, Nigeria. 
Mobile: +234 (803) 3174409...................sssss